International Day of Persons with Disabilities 3 December 2017

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International Day of Persons with Disabilities 3 December 2017

International Day of Persons with Disabilities 3 December 2017: The annual observance of the International Day of Disabled Persons was proclaimed in 1992, by the United Nations General Assembly resolution 47/3. It aims to promote the rights and well-being of persons with disabilities in all spheres of society and development, and to increase awareness of the situation of persons with disabilities in every aspect of political, social, economic and cultural life.

Building on many decades of UN’s work in the field of disability, the Convention on the Rights of Persons with Disabilities, adopted in 2006, has further advanced the rights and well-being of persons with disabilities in the implementation of the 2030 Agenda for Sustainable Development and other international development frameworks, such as the Sendai Framework for Disaster Risk Reduction, the Charter on Inclusion of Persons with Disabilities in Humanitarian Action, the New Urban Agenda, and the Addis Ababa Action Agenda on Financing for Development.

2017 Theme: “Transformation towards sustainable and resilient society for all”

The 2030 Agenda pledges to “leave no one behind”. Persons with disabilities, as both beneficiaries and agents of change, can fast track the process towards inclusive and sustainable development and promote resilient society for all, including in the context of disaster risk reduction and humanitarian action, and urban development. Governments, persons with disabilities and their representative organisations, academic institutions and the private sector need to work as a “team” to achieve the Sustainable Development Goals (SDGs).

Read also:  Medical Treatment of Deprived Citizens (Bipanna Nagarik Kosh), Ministry of Health

ORIGINAL SOURCE OF INFO: UN

Over a billion people in the world - 1 in 7 - experience disability. While they have the same general health 
care needs as others, they are twice as likely to find the skills of health care providers and health care 
facilities inadequate for meeting their needs. In addition half of all people with disability cannot afford 
health care, and they are 50% more likely than others to suffer catastrophic health expenditure. In such cases,
 out-of-pocket health care payments can push their families into poverty. WHO

 

Disability and health

Fact sheet
Reviewed November 2017


Key facts

  • Over a billion people, about 15% of the world’s population, have some form of disability.
  • Between 110 million and 190 million adults have significant difficulties in functioning.
  • Rates of disability are increasing due to population ageing and increases in chronic health conditions, among other causes.
  • People with disabilities have less access to health care services and therefore experience unmet health care needs.

Disability and health

The International Classification of Functioning, Disability and Health (ICF) defines disability as an umbrella term for impairments, activity limitations and participation restrictions. Disability is the interaction between individuals with a health condition (e.g. cerebral palsy, Down syndrome and depression) and personal and environmental factors (e.g. negative attitudes, inaccessible transportation and public buildings, and limited social supports).

Over a billion people are estimated to live with some form of disability. This corresponds to about 15% of the world’s population. Between 110 million (2.2%) and 190 million (3.8%) people 15 years and older have significant difficulties in functioning. Furthermore, the rates of disability are increasing in part due to ageing populations and an increase in chronic health conditions.

Disability is extremely diverse. While some health conditions associated with disability result in poor health and extensive health care needs, others do not. However all people with disabilities have the same general health care needs as everyone else, and therefore need access to mainstream health care services. Article 25 of the UN Convention on the Rights of Persons with Disabilities (CRPD) reinforces the right of persons with disabilities to attain the highest standard of health care, without discrimination.

Unmet needs for health care

People with disabilities report seeking more health care than people without disabilities and have greater unmet needs. For example, a recent survey of people with serious mental disorders, showed that between 35% and 50% of people in developed countries, and between 76% and 85% in developing countries, received no treatment in the year prior to the study.

Health promotion and prevention activities seldom target people with disabilities. For example women with disabilities receive less screening for breast and cervical cancer than women without disabilities. People with intellectual impairments and diabetes are less likely to have their weight checked. Adolescents and adults with disabilities are more likely to be excluded from sex education programmes.

WHO FACT SHEET
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Sagun's Blog is a Public Health Information sharing platform created by Sagun Paudel. The main purpose of this blog is to share public health updates.

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